Hyderabad traffic woes- Singapore skywalks & flyovers are no solution ఆదివారం, జన 10 2016 

 

Hyderabad City in Dire Need of China Wall Dividers on Roads

Purnima Sriram, The New Indian Express, 7th January 2016

Increasing density in traffic is  choking roads in the city, a concern shared by every emerging metropolitan in India. A recent survey by cab company Ola states  that that the average car driving speed in Hyderabad is 19 kmph during peak hours. We are only better  than Bengaluru (18) and Kolkata (17) which have been rated as slowest of all metros. But every problem demands a ‘smart’solution and if we can swear by Telangana government’s  word, then Hyderabad has aced the required solutions to meet  the high density traffic demands of city.

The state  government recently announced multi-level flyovers, skywalks and signal-less junctions will  be developed at 54 places in the city. But will these solutions be effective to tackle traffic woes in the city? Answering to this question Laxman  Rao, HOD of JNTU Civil Engg department, which teaches traffic management as a core subject said,  “The state of traffic management plan is absolutely poor. Around 25 lakh vehicles interacting on these  corridors per day and put to a delay of more than 15 minutes of delay on an average. When we calculate value of travel time it records to `4,000  crore per annum is the congestion price which includes vehicle operating cost, value of person to that time , health etc. Local area planning with  demand, supply, and system analysis are to be conducted. Critical locations  are to be treated with technology and personnel traffic management by L& T people. Pedestrians are to be facilitated at most importance on side walk and continuity of side  walk,” he said. He also suggested a few practices that would surely be effective to control the nerve wrecking traffic. (మరింత…)

ప్రకటనలు

Remembering Maqbool Fida Hussain – Shashi Tharoor శనివారం, జూన్ 9 2012 

M.F. Husain
Artist, 95

By SHASHI THAROOR, TIME, Dec 14, 2011

I first met M.F. Husain in New York when he was already a legend — “India’s Picasso,” the barefoot reinventor of Indian traditions through his prolific and iconoclastic paintbrush. We collaborated on a book about my home state of Kerala — 22 of his fine paintings together with my prose — and formed a friendship that was to last nearly two decades, till his passing at a youthful 95.

In an astonishing 60,000 paintings, sketches and murals Husain created an artistic idiom that was instantly recognizable as his — the Cubist slashes, the splashes of vivid colour, the variety of sources of Indian inspiration, especially from Hindu mythology, to whose richness and diversity he brought worldwide appreciation. His output was so prodigious that some of it is uneven. His restless creativity and desire to experiment in other fields led him to become a filmmaker, without conspicuous success, as well as to dabble in poetry and photography, architecture and even furniture-making. This was imaginative energy bubbling over, a zest for life he carried to his deathbed. It was a measure of how youthful he was in his 90s — sprightly, without stick or hearing-aid, fond of fast cars and beautiful women — that his passing came as such a shock to his friends, who had begun to think of him as immortal. (మరింత…)

పోలవరం సంక్షోభం – టీ ఆర్ ఎస్ నీళ్ళు నిజాలు బుధవారం, అక్టో 26 2011 

పోలవరం సంక్షోభం ఎస్ ఈ డబ్ల్యూ కి పరిమతమైతే బానే ఉండేది. ఇది మరో గోదారి స్పెక్ట్రం కుంభకోణం లెక్క అవినీతి, ఆరోపణలు, విచారణలు. వాస్తవాలు తేలినతర్వాత దొరలెవరో దొంగలెవరో నల్గురు వార్తలు చదివి పుర్సత్తుగా మాట్లాడుకొంటరు.

కథ అక్కడ ఆగలేదు. కనుకనే చర్చ. విమర్శ. ఖండనలు. పోలవరం వివాదంలో ఎన్నెన్ని రాజకీయాలో. ప్రస్థుతానికి కొన్నింటిని తప్పనిసరిగా ఆలోచించాలి.

ప్రశ్న ఏంది? జలయగ్నం పేరుతో సాగిన బలియగ్నంలో వాటదారులైన కాంట్రాక్టరు (ఎస్ ఈ డబ్ల్యు) టీ ఆర్ ఎస్ కు బంధువెట్లాయె? నాలుగు పైసలకోసం ఓ క్రిమినల్ ప్రాజెక్టును కట్టి తూర్పు కనుమలను, కోయ జాతిని ఖూని చేసేందుకు ఉవ్వీల్లూరే కాంట్రక్టర్లు పోలవరం మీద యుద్దమే చేసే వాళ్ళకు మిత్రులెట్లాయె. నమస్కారం చేయడానికి ముఖ్యుడెట్లాయే (మరింత…)

Hyderabad Zindabad: City to thrive & survive whatever be its political status గురువారం, జూలై 14 2011 

Hyderabad Zindabad: City to thrive & survive whatever be its political status
Sreekala G, Sai Deepika Amirapu & Hema Ramakrishnan, ET Bureau, 10 Jul, 2011

For a city that came up as an alternative to Golconda, Hyderabad has done quite well for itself in the past 430 years. While Golconda lies as a magnificent ruin, Andhra Pradesh’s capital towers over the Deccan , proclaiming its vitality and zest for life. Hyderabad has overcome wars, invasions and disease, emerging stronger from each trial. Today, as it faces another test, it seems to be charming its hot-blooded claimants into submission. As the Telangana agitation reaches a crucial phase, Hyderabad is back in the spotlight. The proponents of Telangana, where Hyderabad is located, say the city should be the capital of a new state that they hope will be carved out of Andhra Pradesh. For the people of the rest of Andhra Pradesh , there is deep unease. They have huge stakes in the form of emotional, cultural and financial investments in the city. (మరింత…)

Hyderabad architecture ఆదివారం, ఏప్రి 24 2011 

Regal grandeur: A richly embellished archway at the Falaknuma Palace. High ceilings, use of lime and mortar in construction, plenty of cross ventilation and courtyard spaces, which typified the city’s architecture for centuries, are now almost extinct due to lack of adaptation.-Photo: Nagara Gopal

source: The Hindu April 23, 2011 http://www.hindu.com/pp/2011/04/23/stories/2011042350740600.htm

Vaikuntam’s rural Telangana మంగళవారం, ఏప్రి 5 2011 

Familiar figures
Gargi Gupta / Business Standard, April 02, 2011 New Delhi

Despite what the title of his latest exhibition claims, Thota Vaikuntam’s subject of choice remains images from Telangana.

In the increasingly city-centric world of Indian art, Thota Vaikuntam is one of the few painters who continues to be preoccupied with rural India. Though he has been living in the city of Hyderabad for many years now, the men and women Vaikuntam saw as a little boy growing up in his native Boorugupally village in rural Karimnagar continue to people his canvases.

He has painted them again and again over the past three decades, capturing them in all their vivid splendour — bright printed saris and colourful jewellery, their foreheads, palms and feet anointed with large tikas in red and yellow. These are not realistic portraits, but flat, caricatures that are delightful nonetheless. They have become Vaikuntam’s signature that assures him both loyal collectors and a healthy premium in the art market. And over the past few years, his stock has been rising with a large, untitled canvas from 2007 topping Rs 30 lakh at Saffronart’s winter auction in December 2010. (మరింత…)

Political career of cine stars- beginning of the end? శుక్రవారం, మార్చి 4 2011 

Whither Stardom In Politics?
Assessing Chiranjeevi’s Future

K Naresh Kumar, Power Politics, March 2011

Telugu megastar Chiranjeevi’s Praja Rajyam Party with the Congress in Andhra Pradesh has raised questions about the shifting political patterns and trends in southern India. From Hyderabad to Chennai, the two cities where film stars could get into a political career whenever they wanted, at least till two decades ago, the doors are slowly being shut on the overarching political ambitions of superannuated superstars, argues K Naresh Kumar from Hyderabad.

In many ways, the rude reality check was just waiting to happen. Only that it was sooner than expected.

The early February 2011 merger of megastar Chiranjeevi’s Praja Rajyam Party with the Congress in Andhra Pradesh, unconditionally at that, has once again raised important questions about the shifting political patterns and trends in southern India.

From Hyderabad to Chennai, the two cities where film stars could get into a political career whenever they wanted, at least till two decades ago, the doors are slowly being shut on the overarching political ambitions of superannuated superstars.

Earlier, in at least as far as a host of illustrious stars like M G Ramachandran, N T Rama Rao and the temperamental Jayalalitha were concerned, it only looked’ natural’ for them to move on to the political stage and keep serving the fans who had kept them at the numero uno slot for a long, long time. Not anymore.

It does mean, at least for the present, that a successful hero is not an automatic choice for the chief minister’s post. Chiranjeevi’s example is a stark reminder of this fact. In a region where reel merged seamlessly with the real, it no more seems to be an open and shut case. (మరింత…)

Falaknuma Palace and Princess Esra శనివారం, నవం 13 2010 

The Princess diaries
Prabalika M. Borah, The Hindu, MetroPlus November 12, 2010

On the eve of the transformation of the historic Falaknuma Palace into a deluxe hotel, Princess Esra Birgin talks to Prabalika M. Borah on her efforts in restoring the Palace and her tryst with Hyderabad

Navigating through the Old City daytime traffic, we come to the right turn from the main road that leads to the Falaknuma Palace. The road seems to be laid for buggies and horses with trees on both sides. At the end of the road we reach Falaknuma Palace’s first security gate. Uniformed men talking over their walkie-talkies, let us in. After a short uphill drive we reach the Stables — the parking area. Here we go through a second security check and then take a comfortable uphill walk to reach the clock tower — the main entrance that leads one to the palace. The final security check is done here and then a golf cart transfers us to the palace’s main gates.

We walk up the stairs to the sound of the soothing piped piano music. At the right entrance is the Study. We take the carpeted steps. Marble statues on the railing and black and white photographs of the erstwhile Nizams, British residents and luminaries who visited the palace grace the walls.

At the end of the steps, Princess Esra Birgin greets us. “This looks straight out of James Cameron’s Titanic scene, where Jack waits for Rose near the clock,” we exclaim. “Indeed it does, but we will not sink,” laughs Princess Esra as she leads us to a study room through the Jade room. “This is all leather and wood, let’s talk in the Jade room,” she suggests. (మరింత…)

Photo documentation of Hyderabad monuments శుక్రవారం, అక్టో 22 2010 

Photo-docu of monuments begins

J.S. Ifthekhar, The Hindu 21 October 2010

Exercise part of the national mission to prepare a register of archaeological resources

Photo: M. SUBHASH

On a mission: A photo documentary being made by the Archaeology Department on the heritage of the city.

Hyderabad: A massive exercise is on to prepare a database of all antiquities and archaeological findings in the State. This is part of the national mission to prepare a register of archaeological resources in terms of built heritage, sites and antiquities.

For the first time a photo documentation of all protected monuments and museums is being carried out by the Department of Archaeology and Museums in Andhra Pradesh. To start with the Badashahi Ashoorkhana, one of the earliest constructions of Qutb Shahi period, was documented. A classic example of Indo-Iranian architect, this monument was cleared of encroachments only last year.

Detailed work

Gigapan camera is being used to capture high-resolution panoramic images. Minute details of the Ashoorkhana decorated in vibrant colour with enamelled tiles, floral pattern and verses from the Quran were captured.

Next the department did a detailed documentation of the Qutb Shahi tombs, final abode of the Qutb Shahi rulers. Then followed documentation of Makka Masjid, Paigha Tombs, Hayat Bakshi mosque, Monsieur Raymond tomb and Gunfoundry. The Archaeology department is taking the services of its former assistant director, M.A. Qaiyum, in recording the details. (మరింత…)

Hyderabadi identity – Bakthiar Dadabhoy బుధవారం, డిసెం 23 2009 

Opinion

Quo Vadis, Hyderabad?

Whatever happens, the Dakhni in their souls will unite the people of this city

Bakthiar K. Dadabhoy

OUTLOOK The Weekly Newsmagazine, December 28, 2009

Union home minister P. Chidambaram’s declaration on the midnight of December 9 that the Centre would initiate the process of forming the state of Telangana seems to have thrown most Hyderabadis into a severe identity crisis. The last major upheaval relating to Telangana was in 1969. Forty years on, Hyderabad finds itself caught once more in the political crossfire. In the case of Telangana, it has not been ethnicity but socio-economic deprivation resulting from political exclusion that has powered the sinews of the demand for a separate state. Language and culture are no longer a focal point of identity in the dynamics of federalism. It is economics which determines the new federal politics. Telangana and Andhra speak the same language but their economic interests are diametrically opposed. In fact, the latter accuses coastal Andhra of exploiting its resources.

There was a feeling (which still persists) that people from outside (read Andhra) were carpetbaggers and not stakeholders in Hyderabad. In part, this feeling can be explained by the fact that the feudal culture of Hyderabad was unable to deal with the entrepreneurial spirit of the people from Andhra. Their aggression and drive proved more than a bellyful for the laidback Hyderabadis. Anyone who has lived in Hyderabad will testify that ‘parsaun’, which in the Hindi heartland means ‘the day after tomorrow’ can stretch from a week to never. To live by such lexical precision is to create avoidable tension, and ever since I moved to Secunderabad, I have tried to liberate myself from the tyranny of the calendar and the clock in such matters.

Hyderabad has been the meeting place of many different cultures and traditions. It has over the years developed its own distinctive ‘Ganga-Jamuna’ culture. Hyderabad is a cosmopolitan city: people never identify themselves by their religion but only as Hyderabadis. Dussehra, Diwali or Sankranti are all meant to be enjoyed, whether one is Hindu or not. And Id brings celebrations not for a single community but for the entire city. Faith is a personal matter and what unites one is the sense of belonging to Hyderabad. (Old-timers say all this is a thing of the past, but I believe such pessimism is unwarranted).

Language is not a problem. The unique lingua franca, Dakhni, one of the most identifiable markers of Hyderabad, is a delicious blend of Hindi, Urdu and Telugu, with a lacing of old Marathi. The plural character of the city dates back to its founder, Quli Qutb Shah, who was also a Telugu scholar. Geographically too, it is inclusive: the twin cities, Hyderabad and Secunderabad, do not exhibit the cleavage in environment that divides, say, South Mumbai and the suburbs, or the Calcuttan whose life is confined south of Park Street. And now there is also Cyberabad, as the 400-year-old city constantly reinvents itself. (మరింత…)