Hyderabad Zindabad: City to thrive & survive whatever be its political status గురువారం, జూలై 14 2011 

Hyderabad Zindabad: City to thrive & survive whatever be its political status
Sreekala G, Sai Deepika Amirapu & Hema Ramakrishnan, ET Bureau, 10 Jul, 2011

For a city that came up as an alternative to Golconda, Hyderabad has done quite well for itself in the past 430 years. While Golconda lies as a magnificent ruin, Andhra Pradesh’s capital towers over the Deccan , proclaiming its vitality and zest for life. Hyderabad has overcome wars, invasions and disease, emerging stronger from each trial. Today, as it faces another test, it seems to be charming its hot-blooded claimants into submission. As the Telangana agitation reaches a crucial phase, Hyderabad is back in the spotlight. The proponents of Telangana, where Hyderabad is located, say the city should be the capital of a new state that they hope will be carved out of Andhra Pradesh. For the people of the rest of Andhra Pradesh , there is deep unease. They have huge stakes in the form of emotional, cultural and financial investments in the city. (మరింత…)

ప్రకటనలు

Falaknuma Palace and Princess Esra శనివారం, నవం 13 2010 

The Princess diaries
Prabalika M. Borah, The Hindu, MetroPlus November 12, 2010

On the eve of the transformation of the historic Falaknuma Palace into a deluxe hotel, Princess Esra Birgin talks to Prabalika M. Borah on her efforts in restoring the Palace and her tryst with Hyderabad

Navigating through the Old City daytime traffic, we come to the right turn from the main road that leads to the Falaknuma Palace. The road seems to be laid for buggies and horses with trees on both sides. At the end of the road we reach Falaknuma Palace’s first security gate. Uniformed men talking over their walkie-talkies, let us in. After a short uphill drive we reach the Stables — the parking area. Here we go through a second security check and then take a comfortable uphill walk to reach the clock tower — the main entrance that leads one to the palace. The final security check is done here and then a golf cart transfers us to the palace’s main gates.

We walk up the stairs to the sound of the soothing piped piano music. At the right entrance is the Study. We take the carpeted steps. Marble statues on the railing and black and white photographs of the erstwhile Nizams, British residents and luminaries who visited the palace grace the walls.

At the end of the steps, Princess Esra Birgin greets us. “This looks straight out of James Cameron’s Titanic scene, where Jack waits for Rose near the clock,” we exclaim. “Indeed it does, but we will not sink,” laughs Princess Esra as she leads us to a study room through the Jade room. “This is all leather and wood, let’s talk in the Jade room,” she suggests. (మరింత…)

Hyderabadi identity – Bakthiar Dadabhoy బుధవారం, డిసెం 23 2009 

Opinion

Quo Vadis, Hyderabad?

Whatever happens, the Dakhni in their souls will unite the people of this city

Bakthiar K. Dadabhoy

OUTLOOK The Weekly Newsmagazine, December 28, 2009

Union home minister P. Chidambaram’s declaration on the midnight of December 9 that the Centre would initiate the process of forming the state of Telangana seems to have thrown most Hyderabadis into a severe identity crisis. The last major upheaval relating to Telangana was in 1969. Forty years on, Hyderabad finds itself caught once more in the political crossfire. In the case of Telangana, it has not been ethnicity but socio-economic deprivation resulting from political exclusion that has powered the sinews of the demand for a separate state. Language and culture are no longer a focal point of identity in the dynamics of federalism. It is economics which determines the new federal politics. Telangana and Andhra speak the same language but their economic interests are diametrically opposed. In fact, the latter accuses coastal Andhra of exploiting its resources.

There was a feeling (which still persists) that people from outside (read Andhra) were carpetbaggers and not stakeholders in Hyderabad. In part, this feeling can be explained by the fact that the feudal culture of Hyderabad was unable to deal with the entrepreneurial spirit of the people from Andhra. Their aggression and drive proved more than a bellyful for the laidback Hyderabadis. Anyone who has lived in Hyderabad will testify that ‘parsaun’, which in the Hindi heartland means ‘the day after tomorrow’ can stretch from a week to never. To live by such lexical precision is to create avoidable tension, and ever since I moved to Secunderabad, I have tried to liberate myself from the tyranny of the calendar and the clock in such matters.

Hyderabad has been the meeting place of many different cultures and traditions. It has over the years developed its own distinctive ‘Ganga-Jamuna’ culture. Hyderabad is a cosmopolitan city: people never identify themselves by their religion but only as Hyderabadis. Dussehra, Diwali or Sankranti are all meant to be enjoyed, whether one is Hindu or not. And Id brings celebrations not for a single community but for the entire city. Faith is a personal matter and what unites one is the sense of belonging to Hyderabad. (Old-timers say all this is a thing of the past, but I believe such pessimism is unwarranted).

Language is not a problem. The unique lingua franca, Dakhni, one of the most identifiable markers of Hyderabad, is a delicious blend of Hindi, Urdu and Telugu, with a lacing of old Marathi. The plural character of the city dates back to its founder, Quli Qutb Shah, who was also a Telugu scholar. Geographically too, it is inclusive: the twin cities, Hyderabad and Secunderabad, do not exhibit the cleavage in environment that divides, say, South Mumbai and the suburbs, or the Calcuttan whose life is confined south of Park Street. And now there is also Cyberabad, as the 400-year-old city constantly reinvents itself. (మరింత…)